Tanzania is serious about fighting poaching of elephantsThe fight against poaching in Tanzania and Africa as a whole seems to be a never ending one. The latest development in this worthwhile campaign is the Elephant conference which will take place tomorrow, to address the poaching issue and elephant conservation.

The conference has been organised by the Tanzanian government together with the United States of America (USA), the international conservation caucus foundation (ICCF) and the United Nation Development Program (UNDP). It will take place on Friday of this week in the Tanzania Capital Dar es Salaam. According to Tanzania’s Minister for Tourism and Natural resources, Mr. Lazaro Nyalandu, quite a number of both national and international wildlife conservation stakeholders are expected to attend the conference which has been dubbed the Elephant Summit.

Wild life poaching in Africa has become an issue of major concern with the continuously escalating numbers of animals being poached and killed even in wildlife conservation areas. Various animals such as elephants and rhinos are being hunted and killed for parts and meats for domestic consumption. Some of the poaching is done by poor communities looking for food to feed their families.

Whatever the reasons the phenomenon is having a negative effect on tourism in the Tanzania.

According to UNDP reports, there are over 400 elephants killed every day in Africa, mostly driven by the demand for ivory in various parts of the world. The focus of poaching has shifted from a range of different wildlife species to a very intensive focus on elephants and rhinos. These recent reports and developments have made the scheduling of this elephant conference a necessity.

Tanzania depends quite heavily on its tourism industry through tourist packages such Tanzanian safaris, and holidays, so in an effort to conserve wildlife and save tourism in Tanzania, the government launched an anti poaching campaign “operation Tokomeza’ aimed at protecting wildlife from poaching.

Poachers of elephants and other rare species in Africa however are proving to be elusive, and quite determined. Many have advanced tools, and high tech military weapons and surveillance equipment which essentially requires those fighting the poaching to be equally or better equipped.

Considering the threat that wild life poaching poses for the tourism in Tanzania and Africa as a whole, the elephant conference couldn’t be scheduled be scheduled at a better time. The conference will provide an opportunity for stakeholders to share ideas, expertise, make recommendations for sustainable and feasible solutions and ways to fight wildlife poaching.

Tanzania as a popular Africa Safari destination boasts of a number of wildlife conservation parks and has is one of the few African states with a large population of elephants spread out in the various parks and game reserves.